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  • 27 Dec 2021 Journal Article Communication Methods and Measures

    Three Gaps in Computational Text Analysis Methods for Social Sciences: A Research Agenda

    Christian Baden, Christian Pipal, Martijn Schoonvelde, Mariken AC G van der Velden
    Abstract

    We identify three gaps that limit the utility and obstruct the progress of computational text analysis methods (CTAM) for social science research. First, we contend that CTAM development has prioritized technological over validity concerns, giving limited attention to the operationalization of social scientific measurements. Second, we identify a mismatch between CTAMs’

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  • 14 Dec 2021 Journal Article Journal of Language and Politics

    “These are not just slogans” Assertions of friendship between states

    Abstract

    The goal of this study is to capture the meaning of interstate friendship from the perspective of international actors and to underline the benefits of analyzing speech acts as a tool for revealing the relational scripts that guide interstate relations. Analysis of the discourse surrounding 215 assertions of friendship made by statespersons in a variety of diplomatic

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  • 10 Dec 2021 Journal Article Journalism

    Encoding polysemy in the news

    Abstract

    Although media-audience encounters are always potentially open to different interpretations, little is known about the textual mechanisms that encourage polysemy. Focusing on a story about a CEO who pledged to drastically cut his pay to increase his employees’ salaries, this study compared news reports that covered the same event but were met by different levels of

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  • 9 Dec 2021 Preprint SocArXiv

    A Comparative Privacy Research Framework

    Philipp K Masur, Dmitry Epstein, Kelly Quinn, Carsten Wilhelm, Lemi Baruh, Christoph Lutz
    Abstract

    The ways in which privacy is defined, perceived, and enacted are contingent on cultural, social, political, economic, and technological structures. Privacy research, however, is often conducted in settings that do not account for variations in how privacy is perceived and enacted. A comparative perspective explicitly addresses this shortcoming by requiring the

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  • 4 Dec 2021 Book Chapter Digital Holocaust Memory, Education and Research

    i-Memory: Selfies and Self-Witnessing in #Uploading_Holocaust (2016)

    Abstract

    This chapter explores the implications of the selfie-perspective for Holocaust memory in the digital age. We analyse sequences from the Israeli documentary film, #Uploading_Holocaust (2016), which were taken during visits at memorial sites. We argue that such audio-visual self-representations communicate the complex relationship between individual subject positions, a

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  • 1 Dec 2021 Journal Article Israel Studies Review

    Female Politicians' Gendered Communicative Structures: A Multimodal Combination of Masculine Verbal and Feminine Nonverbal Patterns

    Abstract

    Recently there has been growing number of women running for national political positions. This study presents multimodal gender communicative-structures of female politicians. We analyzed 80 politi-cal interviews by all female politicians who ran for the 20th Knesset in Israel (n=40). The findings revealed novel integrated structures that combine masculine-verbal and

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  • Dec 2021 Conference Paper 2021 GigaNet Annual Symposium

    Privacy by debate: A content analysis of post Cambridge Analytica congressional hearings

    Abstract

    Ever since data were pronounced as the new oil, questions of digital privacy became equivalent to those of climate change - the paramount, long-term importance of what is at stake, clashes with the seeming insignificance and intangibility of consequences of small, mundane actions. In their search after this “Cheshire cat of values” (Franzen, 2003, p. 42), researchers

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  • 30 Nov 2021 Journal Article Psychological Science

    Where the Blame Lies: Unpacking Groups Into Their Constituent Subgroups Shifts Judgments of Blame in Intergroup Conflict

    Nir Halevy, Ifat Maoz, Preeti Vani, Emily S Reit
    Abstract

    Whom do individuals blame for intergroup conflict? Do people attribute responsibility for intergroup conflict to the in-group or the out-group? Theoretically integrating the literatures on intergroup relations, moral psychology, and judgment and decision-making, we propose that unpacking a group by explicitly describing it in terms of its constituent subgroups increases

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  • 24 Nov 2021 Journal Article Feminist Media Studies

    Gendered power relations in the digital age: an analysis of Japanese women’s media choice and use within a global context

    Kaori Hayashi, Pablo J Boczkowski, Neta Kligler-Vilenchik, Eugenia Mitchelstein, Keren Tenenboim-Weinblatt, Mikko Villi
    Abstract

    This study investigates the persistence of gendered choice and use of media, particularly in Japanese domestic settings. It shows how women’s significant presence in the digital media environment does not necessarily translate into substantial changes in gendered power dynamics in choosing and using particular media for certain purposes at home. This project’s authors

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  • 24 Nov 2021 Journal Article The International Journal of Press/Politics

    Youth Political Talk in the Changing Media Environment: A Cross-National Typology

    Neta Kligler-Vilenchik, Keren Tenenboim-Weinblatt, Pablo J Boczkowski, Kaori Hayashi, Eugenia Mitchelstein, Mikko Villi
    Abstract

    While political communication scholarship has long underscored the importance of political talk—casual conversations about news and politics that occur in everyday situations—as a way for citizens to clarify their opinions and as a precursor for political engagement, much of this literature tends to depict political talk as uncomfortable and difficult for citizens. Yet

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  • 5 Nov 2021 Journal Article Convergence

    Thumbs up and down: The cultural technique of thumb-typing

    Abstract

    This paper explores thumb-typing as a cultural technique stemming from the mutual development of typing interfaces and practices. Focusing on the work of the typing fingers, it examines how the assignment of thumbs to be the primary writing digits is an innovation that correlates—and in some respects causes—textual and social changes that are central to digital culture

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  • 5 Nov 2021 Journal Article Communications

    Whose media are hostile? The spillover effect of interpersonal discussions on media bias perceptions

    Laia Castro-Herrero, David Nicolas Hopmann, Lilach Nir
    Abstract

    Since Eveland and Shah (2003) published their seminal study on the impact of social networks on media bias perceptions in the US, little has been researched about the interpersonal antecedents of hostile media perceptions. In this study we address this gap by investigating the role of safe, or like-minded, political discussions on individuals’ likelihood to perceive

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  • 29 Oct 2021 Journal Article Language and Dialogue

    Communicating communication: The recursive expertise of communication experts

    Abstract

    Recent years saw the rise of communication experts, operating in various contexts and enjoying high levels of popularity. The paper examines this expertise asking: What kind of expertise do communication experts hold? What is the communication they are expert in? And what can scholars of communication learn from experts who practice it professionally? Based on in-depth

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  • 20 Oct 2021 Journal Article Information, Communication & Society

    The value(s) of social media rituals: a cross-cultural analysis of New Year’s resolutions

    Abstract

    New Year’s resolutions are acts of valuation where people express ideas about what is important and worthwhile in life. Although resolutions have a long history, the twenty-first century has transformed the practice into a social media ritual with greater visibility, interactivity, and reach. Using this unique event to explore the globalization of values, we analyze

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  • 16 Oct 2021 Journal Article Journal of Divorce & Remarriage

    Adolescents in Divorced Families: The Interplay of Attachment Patterns, Family Environment, and Personal Characteristics

    Idit Finkelstein, Tsfira Grebelsky-Lichtman
    Abstract

    The study examined adolescents (N = 230) in divorced families in relation to the adolescent’s attachment pattern, family environment, and personal characteristics. The findings revealed significant direct links of attachment patterns. Avoidant and anxious attachment patterns were found to influence adolescent loneliness, neuroticism, and well-being. Family

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  • 9 Oct 2021 Journal Article New Media & Society

    Does the platform matter? Social media and COVID-19 conspiracy theory beliefs in 17 countries

    Yannis Theocharis, Ana Sofia Cardenal, Soyeon Jin, Toril Aalberg, David Nicolas Hopmann, Jesper Stromback, Laia Castro-Herrero, Frank Esser, Peter Van Aelst, Claes H de Vreese, Nicoleta Corbu, Karolina Koc-Michalska, Jörg Matthes, Christian Schemer, Tamir Sheafer, Sergio Splendore, James Stanyer, Agnieszka Stępińska, Václav Štětka
    Abstract

    While the role of social media in the spread of conspiracy theories has received much attention, a key deficit in previous research is the lack of distinction between different types of platforms. This study places the role of social media affordances in facilitating the spread of conspiracy beliefs at the center of its enquiry. We examine the relationship between

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  • Oct 2021 Journal Article Political Communication

    Strategy News Is Good News: How Journalistic Coverage of Politics Reduces Affective Polarization

    Abstract

    What role does news content play in explaining inter-party hostility? We argue that affective polarization is influenced by exposure to one of the most dominant ways to cover politics: strategy coverage. While previous studies have pointed to the negative consequences of covering politicians’ strategies and campaign tactics, we find that this reporting style decreases

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  • 23 Sep 2021 Journal Article Plos One

    Personalism or party platform? Gender quotas and women's representation under different electoral system orientations

    Aliza Forman-Rabinovici, Lilach Nir
    Abstract

    Underrepresentation of women in politics is a matter of great concern to social scientists, citizens, and policymakers alike. Despite effort over the past decade to ameliorate it with gender quotas of different types, scientific research provides a mixed picture on the extent to which quotas can close these gender gaps under different conditions. We approach this puzzle

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  • 19 Sep 2021 Journal Article Information, Communication & Society

    Memetic commemorations: remixing far-right values in digital spheres

    Abstract

    This paper examines memetic content as a window into the values expressed by far-right constituents. Our main premise was that far-right memes are a site of interaction between two types of values: those of the far-right as a social movement and those characterizing memetic communication on social media. We studied this notion through a case from Italy: the photo-based

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  • 15 Sep 2021 Conference Paper The 22nd Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers

    Privacy, Covid-19 and Online Teaching: A Comparative Study in Estonia, France and Israel

    Dmitry Epstein, Nicholas A John, Carsten Willhelm, Christine Barats, Andra Siibak
    Abstract

    The COVID-19 crisis is a potential watershed moment for privacy with profound long-term effects on the organization and practices of work, education, and civic engagement. In this study we focus on the profound re-negotiation of mediated personal boundaries in times of mass lockdowns and social distancing. To understand how these new social conditions might be playing

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  • 15 Sep 2021 Conference Paper The 22nd Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers

    Vertical or Horizontal? An Empirical Investigation of the Role of Privacy Literacy and Privacy Self-efficacy on the Dimensionality of Privacy

    Dmitry Epstein, Kelly Quinn
    Abstract

    The goals of this study are two-fold. We extend established models linking attitudes related to privacy concerns and privacy protecting behavior (PPB) by (a) differentiating between horizontal (social) and vertical (institutional) orientations of PPB as capturing an aspect of privacy multidimensionality, and (b) introducing additional explanatory factors such as privacy

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  • 15 Sep 2021 Conference Paper The 22nd Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers

    Cart Narcs and the Engineering of Social Shaming as Entertainment

    Abstract

    The typical Cart Narcs YouTube video opens with “Agent Sebastian” walking through a grocery store parking lot. Sebastian briefly explains the video's purpose - "We shame people who don't put their carts back" - as he looks for a cart miscreant to confront. When he spots a target, he runs towards them making siren noises, outfitted in a Cart Narcs t-shirt and a police-style

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  • 15 Sep 2021 Journal Article The International Journal of Higher Education

    An Integrative Multi-Dimensional Model of Culturally Relevant Academic Evaluation for the 21st Century

    Idit Finkelstein, Shira Soffer-Vital, Yael Shraga-Roitman, Revital Cohen-Liverant, Tsfira Grebelsky-Lichtman
    Abstract

    Due to Covid-19, the world has encountered new challenges regarding pedagogy, learning, assessment, and evaluation. In meeting these challenges, there have been rapid changes in learning, and the gap between pedagogy and evaluation has grown. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new evaluative model suitable for the technologically enhanced, multicultural environment

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  • 15 Sep 2021 Journal Article Digital Journalism

    Collective Social Correction: Addressing Misinformation through Group Practices of Information Verification on WhatsApp

    Abstract

    Recent years show a growing concern about the spread of misinformation on social media. One of the avenues to address this challenge is the practice of social correction—the correction of misinformation conducted by other social media users. While social correction focuses on individuals in the context of their respective social media networks, we offer the concept of

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  • 15 Sep 2021 Conference Paper The 22nd Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers

    Hashtag Activism Lost in Translation: The Reformulation of #MeToo in Japan

    Saki Mizoroki, Limor Shifman, Kaori Hayashi
    Abstract

    In 2017, the #MeToo movement lit up Twitter. In Japan, however, it was almost nonexistent and morphed into other forms of hashtag activism: #WeToo, #WithYou,and #furawademo (“flower demo”). This paper investigates both the absence of #MeToo in Japan and its reformulations. We hypothesize that these could be explained through the interplay of three avenues: (1) values—the

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  • 15 Sep 2021 Conference Paper The 22nd Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers

    The Cheshire Cat of Social Media: Values in Platform Policies

    Abstract

    Value is fundamental for social media platforms, not only in the economic sense but also in the sense of normative principles like community and free speech. Policy documents are pivotal sites for the expression of values and present a public-facing account of the roles and responsibilities assigned to various actors, including individual users, third parties, governments

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  • 14 Sep 2021 Book Chapter Engaging Theories in Interpersonal Communication

    Discrepant Verbal–Nonverbal Profile Theory: Making Sense of Contradicting Messages in Interpersonal Communication

    Abstract

    This chapter presents a novel discrepant verbal/nonverbal profile (DVNP) theory that assesses verbal and nonverbal modes of communication and their interrelatedness. Discrepant communication is conceptualized as an inconsistency or contradiction between verbal and nonverbal communications, which is a central assertion in interpersonal communication. The DVNP framework

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  • 3 Sep 2021 Book Chapter Handbook of Global Media Ethics

    Levinas and Media Ethics: Between the Particular and the Universal

    Abstract

    This chapter seeks inspiration for media ethics in the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas. Levinas’s ethical message concerns the import of the relation with the Other, a relation that interrupts any attempt at its thematization, including Levinas’s own philosophy. Levinas’s writing serves as an exemplary medium for this ethical message in conveying the teaching of ethics

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  • 1 Sep 2021 Book Chapter Media, Culture & Society

    Commemorating from a distance: the digital transformation of Holocaust memory in times of COVID-19

    Abstract

    The severe restrictions on public life in many countries following the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic specifically affected Holocaust memorials and museums in all parts of the world, especially in Europe and in Israel. These measures posed a significant challenge, because contemporary forms of Holocaust commemoration are particularly based on the personal experience

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  • 27 Aug 2021 Journal Article Journal of Communication

    What Does #Freedom Look Like? Instagram and the Visual Imagination of Values

    Abstract

    Instagram is the place for the visualization of everything, from travel and food to abstract concepts such as freedom. Over the past decade, the platform has introduced a bottom-up process where users co-produce image repertoires that shape the boundaries of the imaginable. Drawing on an epistemology of social constructionism, we ask which visual repertoires are associated

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  • 18 Aug 2021 Book Chapter Digital Religion

    Authority: the passive-aggressive Haredi campaign against the smartphone

    Hananel Rosenberg, Menahem Blondheim
    Abstract

    The forceful and creative campaign of ultra-Orthodox Jewish leadership against open digital connectivity via the cell phone has been facing steep challenges in recent years. Initially, the kosher-phone solution that this leadership engineered, which enabled mobile telephony without compromising the isolation of the community or strict social control within it, was highly

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  • 17 Aug 2021 Journal Article Communication Methods and Measures

    Machine Translation Vs. Multilingual Dictionaries Assessing Two Strategies for the Topic Modeling of Multilingual Text Collections

    Daniel Maier, Christian Baden, Daniela Stoltenberg, Maya de Vries Kedem, Annie Waldherr
    Abstract

    The goal of this paper is to evaluate two methods for the topic modeling of multilingual document collections: (1) machine translation (MT), and (2) the coding of semantic concepts using a multilingual dictionary (MD) prior to topic modeling. We empirically assess the consequences of these approaches based on both a quantitative comparison of models and a qualitative

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  • 14 Aug 2021 Journal Article Information, Communication & Society

    Online tie and content management and changing religious identity among Muslim Arab women in Israel

    Abstract

    This study investigates the central dilemmas and changes in social media use among people whose religious identity is in flux, with an emphasis on backstage processes of decision making. Drawing on 15 in-depth interviews with Muslim women in Israel, we found five main themes reflecting the main online changes users experience and effect. We suggest two different logics

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  • 9 Aug 2021 Journal Article Political Communication

    Does Talking to the Other Side Reduce Inter-party Hostility? Evidence from Three Studies

    Eran Amsalem, Eric Merkley, Peter John Loewen
    Abstract

    According to recent scholarship, citizens in various Western democracies show a growing sense of dislike and distrust toward members of opposing political parties. While political communication processes have been shown to influence inter-party hostility, the literature has so far focused mainly on mass-mediated communication. We argue here that affective polarization

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  • 2 Aug 2021 Preprint Social Science Research Network

    The View from Above: Framing of Digital Privacy in Post Cambridge Analytica Congressional Hearings

    Abstract

    How do policy and technological elites talk about privacy? Increasingly, researchers call for a multidimensional and contextual view of privacy as an object of study. Such calls have advanced both conceptual and empirical understanding of how citizens think about privacy and enact privacy-related behaviors in networked environments. At the same time, scandals such as

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  • 1 Aug 2021 Journal Article Communication Theory

    Beyond neutrality: Conceptualizing platform values

    Abstract

    Social media platforms are prominent sites where values are expressed, contested, and diffused. In this article, we present a conceptual framework for studying the communication of values on and through social media composed of two dimensions: scale (from individual users to global infrastructures) and explicitness (from the most explicit to the invisible). Utilizing

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  • 1 Aug 2021 Journal Article Memory Studies

    Memorials as discursive spheres: Holocaust and Second World War iconography in public commemoration of extremist-right violence

    Abstract

    In recent decades, the experience of non-governmental politically motivated violence became a central element of global memory culture. Motivated by several shocking attacks at the beginning of the new millennium, this commemorative culture evolved in a memory ecology, which was significantly shaped by the prosperity of global Holocaust memory. Therefore, public

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  • 1 Aug 2021 Journal Article Technology in Society

    The smartphone and its punishment: Social distancing of cellular transgressors in ultra-Orthodox Jewish society, from 2G to the Corona pandemic

    Hananel Rosenberg, Menahem Blondheim
    Abstract

    Over the past 20 years, the leaders of Israel's ultra-Orthodox (haredi) community carried out an intensive campaign against the diffusion of mobile phones in their enclave society. It included a variety of resistance strategies that escalated in parallel to the consistent increase in mobile phone penetration into the community. If at first the “cellphone danger” was

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  • 25 Jul 2021 Journal Article Internet Histories

    Aleph-bet, dits-and-dahs, zeros and ones: representing Hebrew in character code

    Abstract

    One of the basic features facilitating communication on the Internet in a variety of languages is Unicode code-layout. It standardizes the representation of most of the world’s writing systems on digital media, thus enabling the process and transmission of information through such technologies. Unicode is a contemporary character code, and this paper traces its evolvement

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  • 21 Jul 2021 Journal Article Digital Journalism

    Does a Crisis Change News Habits? A Comparative Study of the Effects of COVID-19 on News Media Use in 17 European Countries

    Peter Van Aelst, Fanni Toth, Laia Castro-Herrero, Václav Štětka, Claes H de Vreese, Toril Aalberg, Ana Sofia Cardenal, Nicoleta Corbu, Frank Esser, David Nicolas Hopmann, Karolina Koc-Michalska, Jörg Matthes, Christian Schemer, Tamir Sheafer, Sergio Splendore, James Stanyer, Agnieszka Stępińska, Jesper Stromback, Yannis Theocharis
    Abstract

    Exogenous shocks like the COVID-19 pandemic unleashes multiple fundamental questions about society beyond public health. Based on the classical concept of ‘need for orientation’ and the literature on the role of the media in times of crisis, we investigate to what extent the COVID-19 pandemic affected news consumption in comparative perspective. Based on a two-wave

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  • Jul 2021 Journal Article Journal of Pragmatics

    Political speech acts in contrast: The case of calls to condemn in news interviews

    Abstract

    This study takes a contrastive pragmatics approach to examine the ethical and moral discourses constructed around calls to condemn realized by journalists in two political linguacultures: Israel and the US. By studying the contents and the contexts within which Israeli and American news interviewers formulated 215 variations of do you condemn questions between 2006 and

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  • 20 Jun 2021 Book Chapter Mediated Terrorism in the 21st Century

    Return to Entebbe: CineTerrorism as Contested Memory

    Abstract

    In “Return to Entebbe: CineTerrorism as Contested Memory” Tobias Ebbrecht-Hartmann considers the historical drama 7 Days in Entebbe (José Padilha, 2018), which retells a key terrorist event in Israeli history: the rescue mission of a highjacked French plane in the night of July 4th 1976. The Israeli special military team rescued more than 100 hostages from the old

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  • 14 Jun 2021 Journal Article Photographies

    Sentient Photography: Image-Production and the Smartphone Camera

    Abstract

    Thanks to the smartphone, photography has become pervasive in contemporary digital culture. Yet the smartphone’s very ‘smartness’ profoundly alters the relations of control between humans and technologies in image-production practices. Unlike dedicated cameras, smartphones use built-in sensors for small-scale positioning to ‘sense’ user’s bodily orientations and states

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  • 20 May 2021 Journal Article Foreign Policy Analysis

    Reframing, Remorse, and Reassurance: Remedial Work in Diplomatic Crises

    Abstract

    This paper suggests a framework for studying how remedial actions are deployed following diplomatic crisis. On the basis of thirty-four case studies and twenty-one interviews with senior statespersons, we offer a novel typology of remedial strategies employed for diffusing interstate tension and pinpoint the various calculations taken by decision-makers in performing

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  • 14 May 2021 Journal Article Digital Journalism

    Taking a Break from News: A Five-nation Study of News Avoidance in the Digital Era

    Mikko Villi, Tali Aharoni, Keren Tenenboim-Weinblatt, Pablo J Boczkowski, Kaori Hayashi, Eugenia Mitchelstein, Akira Tanaka, Neta Kligler-Vilenchik
    Abstract

    This article comparatively examines news avoidance in a rapidly changing media environment. We utilize findings from a large dataset of 488 in-depth interviews with media consumers, conducted in Argentina, Finland, Israel, Japan, and the US. We aim to make a contribution to the study of news avoidance by providing a comprehensive and nuanced understanding of the drivers

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  • 11 May 2021 Journal Article The International Journal of Press/Politics

    Navigating High-choice European Political Information Environments: A Comparative Analysis of News User Profiles and Political Knowledge

    Laia Castro-Herrero, Jesper Stromback, Frank Esser, Peter Van Aelst, Claes H de Vreese, Toril Aalberg, Ana Sofia Cardenal, Nicoleta Corbu, David Nicolas Hopmann, Karolina Koc-Michalska, Jörg Matthes, Christian Schemer, Tamir Sheafer, Sergio Splendore, James Stanyer, Agnieszka Stępińska, Václav Štětka, Yannis Theocharis
    Abstract

    The transition from low- to high-choice media environments has had far-reaching implications for citizens’ media use and its relationship with political knowledge. However, there is still a lack of comparative research on how citizens combine the usage of different media and how that is related to political knowledge. To fill this void, we use a unique cross-national

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  • 9 May 2021 Journal Article New Media & Society

    Mapping the transnational imaginary of social media genres

    Abstract

    This article presents a transnational study of the classification and evaluation of social media content. We conducted a large-scale survey (N = 4770) in five countries (Germany, Italy, Japan, South Korea, and the United States) with open-ended questions about the types of content people like and dislike. Through iterative and inductive coding, we identified 29 topics

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  • 1 May 2021 Journal Article European Political Science Review

    Story incentive: the effect of national stories on voter turnout

    Shaul R Shenhav, Tamir Sheafer, Alon Zoizner, Anita M J van Hoof, Jan Kleinnijenhuis, Yael Rivkah Kaplan, David Nicolas Hopmann
    Abstract

    This article contends that an important driver of turnout is the national stories embraced by citizens. We suggest the notion of ‘story incentive,’ whereby adopting a group’s story components – those that connect the past, the future, and prominent national characters – motivates individuals to participate in that group’s political activities. Leaning on narrative

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  • 26 Apr 2021 Journal Article Language & Communication

    “Flattery helps”: Relational practices in statecraft

    Abstract

    This paper provides an explanation for how coworkers manage to cultivate close relationships in an extremely competitive workplace. Our case study is the workplace of statespersons, considered an impersonal, rule-governed, and interest-motivated social environment, and as such, provides indications for how counterparts overcome alienation and suspicion in developing

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  • 13 Apr 2021 Journal Article Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

    I Care About Your Plight, But Only If I Like Your Leader: The Effect of National Leaders’ Perceived Personality on Empathy and Pro-Social Behavior Towards Their Citizenry

    Abstract

    People’s default levels of empathy toward members of a distant group tend to be low. The current research shows that favorable perceptions regarding the personality of a group’s leader can stimulate empathy and pro-social behavior toward his or her countrymen. In four experimental studies (N = 884), we found that exposure to a news article that positively (vs. negatively)

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