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  • 9 Apr 2022 Preprint OSF Preprints

    Adam Smith and the Wealth-Worshipping Spectator

    Abstract

    What explains the ambition to get rich? Adam Smith is clear that commercial ambition, the passionate desire for great wealth, is not simply a desire to satisfy one’s material needs. His argument on what underlies it, however, is not obvious. I review three possibilities suggested by Smith’s work and the scholarly literature – vanity, the love of system, and the desire

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  • Apr 2022 Journal Article Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory

    Public-Sector Honesty and Corruption: Field Evidence from 40 Countries

    Abstract

    This study presents a theoretical model of honest behavior in the public sector (public-sector honesty) and its relationship with corruption. We test this model empirically by utilizing and extending a unique data set of honest behavior of public-and private-sector workers across 40 countries, gathered in a field experiment conducted by Cohn et al.(N= 17,303). We find

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  • 22 Mar 2022 Journal Article Perspectives on Politics

    Party Types in the Age of Personalized Politics

    Abstract

    Democracies in general and political parties in particular have undergone political personalization in recent decades. The power balance between politicians (one or many) and the team (the party as a collegial entity) has changed, and existing party typologies are no longer suited to the analysis of today’s democratic politics. Although some new personalized party types

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  • 15 Mar 2022 Journal Article City, Culture and Society

    Urban artistic interventions: A typology of artistic political actions in the city

    Marie Hoop, Volker Kirchberg, Merav Kaddar, Nir Barak, Avner de Shalit
    Abstract

    How do critical artists intervene in urban space, and why? This question is explored in an interurban fieldwork study examining artistic interventions in four cities: Hanover and Hamburg in Germany, and Tel Aviv-Jaffa and Jerusalem in Israel. Grounded on a plethora of artistic interventions gathered in these cities, the article proposes a typology based on techniques

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  • 11 Mar 2022 Preprint Social Science Research Network

    Varieties of Regulatory Regimes and their Effect on Public Trust in Market Actors

    Libby Maman, Yuval Feldman, David Levi-Faur
    Abstract

    It is widely argued that command-and-control regulation is a burdensome, inefficient, and illiberal form of governance. In recent decades, many efforts have been made to find alternatives that could protect and enhance public interest in a less costly, less legalistic, less punitive, and less paternalistic manner. These alternatives include various instruments under

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  • Mar 2022 Journal Article Modern Intellectual History

    The Downfall of All Slavish Hierarchies: Richard Price on Emancipation, Improvement, and Republican Utopia

    Abstract

    Scholars have been paying increasing attention to the republican theory of liberty developed by the eighteenth-century British radical Richard Price. This article studies his narrative of a revolution of liberty, which consists in the downfall of oppressive powers, the establishment of republican institutions, and the introduction of a utopian age. In distinction from

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  • 1 Mar 2022 Journal Article Acta Politica

    Don’t scratch the moral itch: restoring political image following a scandal

    Abstract

    The psychological literature highlights the dominance of morality in forming social judgments. However, in the political field, recent electoral victories by politicians involved in immoral behavior have shown that immorality does not end careers. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to explain scandalous politicians’ electoral success. In three experiments using both

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  • 19 Feb 2022 Discussion Paper CEPR Centre for Economic Policy Research

    Beyond Development and Wellbeing: Experimenting with the Low Substitution Approach for Social Progress

    Nathan Sussman, Shiri Cohen Kaminitz
    Abstract

    Social progress indices are key for assessing wellbeing and sustainable development of countries and societies. A pivotal neglected question is the appropriate level of substitution between ‘subjective’ - attitudes of individuals - and ‘objective’ - external standards- dimensions of social progress. Each dimension has its own rationale, history, and indicators. Our

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  • 8 Feb 2022 Journal Article Intellectual History Review

    Moral theology and the historian’s conscience: is there a license to besmirch?

    Abstract

    This article examines how Catholic moral theologians analysed the constraints imposed by the rights of the dead to their good name on historical writing and research. The concern of Catholic moral theologians for persons’ rights to their good name coupled with their concern for the rights of dead persons placed serious moral constraints on the work of historians. At

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  • 27 Jan 2022 Journal Article Journal of Urban Affairs

    Leadership development in divided cities: The Homecomer, Middleman, and Pathfinder

    Abstract

    Group leaders play a vital role in divided cities, particularly in local problem-solving and in everyday contestations. Their role as negotiators makes them perfectly positioned to promote urban processes for the group to which they belong but also raises questions regarding their loyalty. Seeking to understand these individuals’ thinking, this study asks how leaders

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  • 6 Jan 2022 Journal Article Political Geography

    Leveraging city officials’ professional and social Identities to facilitate affordable housing

    Abstract

    Housing affordability is an acute problem in many developed economies. It is rooted, inter alia, in a conflict of interests across levels of government. Policies that seek to increase the supply of housing and lower their purchase price are popular among the general electorate, yet local governments deploy urban planning regulations to restrict densification and

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  • 4 Jan 2022 Journal Article Global Intellectual History

    Madariaga, probabilism and the polysynodial regime of the Spanish monarchy

    Abstract

    This paper examines the use of the theological doctrine of probabilism by the Valencian political writer Juan de Madariaga in his Del senado y su príncipe of 1617. Madariaga’s work is but one example of the phenomenal diffusion of probabilism in political and legal writings in seventeenth century Spain. Such popularity must be understood in the institutional context of

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  • 4 Jan 2022 Journal Article Party Politics

    Servants of two (or more) masters: Accounting for the complexity of intraparty candidate selection methods

    O Tuttnauer, Gideon Rahat
    Abstract

    Intraparty candidate selection methods are the drivers of many topics of interest to political scientists. Their operationalization, however, is made complicated because they tend to involve multiple selectorates that differ in their levels of inclusiveness and centralization and that play various roles within the process. This complexity poses a challenge for large-n

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  • Jan 2022 Journal Article Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory

    Discrimination of Minority Welfare Claimants in the Real World: The Effect of Implicit Prejudice

    Michaela Assouline, Sharon Gilad, Pazit Ben-Nun Bloom
    Abstract

    Exploiting rare access to doctors’ real-world judgments of incapacity benefits applications to an Israeli governmental program (2015–17), we examine the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of discrimination against Muslims versus Jews. To mitigate confounding explanations for unequal treatment, we restrict the analysis to claimants whose applications passed a strict

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  • Jan 2022 Journal Article British Journal of Political Science

    Many Ways to be Right: Cross-Pressured Voters in Western Europe

    Abstract

    Mainstream parties in Western Europe are increasingly struggling to hold together their base of support. As a lens for exploring this changing electoral landscape, this article focuses on the growing share of the electorate that is cross-pressured between conservative and progressive attitudes on economic and cultural issues. It argues that a stable asymmetry characterizes

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  • 30 Dec 2021 Preprint medRxiv

    The rich-to-poor vaccine donation game: When will self-interested countries donate their surplus vaccines during pandemics?

    Adam Lampert, Raanan Sulitzeanu-Kenan, Pieter Vanhuysse, Markus Tepe
    Abstract

    When will self-interested vaccine-rich countries voluntarily donate their surplus vaccines to vaccine-poor countries during a pandemic? We develop a game-theoretic approach to address this question. We identify vaccine-rich countries’ optimal surplus donation strategies, and then examine whether these strategies are stable (Nash equilibrium or self-enforcing international

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  • 27 Dec 2021 Book Chapter Routledge Handbook ON China–Middle East Relations

    China and the Middle East: An autobiographical perspective

    Abstract

    My involvement in China studies, and more specifically in the study of China’s Middle East policy, began in high school. Discharged from military service as a lieutenant, I continued my academic training at the Hebrew University, graduating summa cum laude with a master’s thesis on Sino-Palestinians relations. Still a student, in 1971 I joined the military intelligence

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  • 17 Dec 2021 Journal Article European Journal of Social Psychology

    A motivational framework of religion: Tying together the why and the how of religion

    Allon Vishkin, Pazit Ben-Nun Bloom, Gizem Arikan, Jeremy Ginges
    Abstract

    Two lines of research in the psychology of religion have developed independently of each other: why people are religious and how they are religious. Leveraging theories of goal constructs, we propose that these two lines of research are connected, such that religious expressions are the manifestation of religious motivations. In Part I, we build and test a model of

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  • 16 Dec 2021 Journal Article A Companion to the Spanish Scholastics

    Jus post bellum

    Abstract

    The early modern scholastics’ detailed discussion of the justice of war also addressed the rights of victors. This chapter examines their views on the permissibility of killing and plundering — both of innocents and of culpable combatants — in the aftermath of victory. The focus is on Francisco de Vitoria, Francisco Suárez and Luis de Molina as well as Pedro de Lorca

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  • 15 Dec 2021 Journal Article The Journal of Interdisciplinary History

    An Early Power-Sharing Regime: The Alternativa System in Spanish Colonial America

    Abstract

    The alternativa system in Spanish American religious orders was an early example of deliberate electoral engineering to address the problem of social division. It was subject to criticism, however, for stealing voters’ freedom, ignoring the rights of candidates, and restricting access to competent officeholders. Moreover, it often gave disproportionate power to a minority

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  • 12 Dec 2021 Journal Article Social Science Research Network

    How Can Governments Respond to Policy Bubbles Driven by Dysfunctional Emotions?

    Abstract

    People at times experience intense dysfunctional emotions that distract their judgment regarding policy problems, policy tools, and/or target populations, leading to the emergence of policy bubbles (i.e., policy over- or underproduction over an extended period). In this paper, I elaborate on three strategies that governments can implement when faced with policy bubbles

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  • 7 Dec 2021 Preprint medRxiv

    The Reputational Dividends of Collaborating with a Highly Reputable Agency: The Case of the FDA and Its Domestic Partner Agencies

    Abstract

    What, if any, dividends do agencies reap from collaboration with a highly reputable agency, such as the FDA? Utilizing a dataset covering 30 U.S. federal agencies over a period of 34 years (1980–2013), we estimate the short and long-term reputational effects of interagency collaboration. Collaboration is measured by the number of memorandums of understanding (MOUs) in

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  • Dec 2021 Journal Article Jewish Political Studies Review

    Betar China: The Impact of a Remote Jewish Youth Movement, 1929-1949

    Abstract

    Scattered over several provinces and cities' and gathered from many countries, China's modern Jewish communities had very little in common. Unlike Europe's Jewish communities, which had lived there for centuries, sharing histories, languages, and cultures, Jews arrived in China between the 1850s (mostly Baghdadi Jews who came by choice) and the late 1930s (mostly refugees

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  • 1 Dec 2021 Journal Article Israel Studies Review

    Blame Avoidance, Crisis Exploitation, and COVID-19 Governance Response in Israel

    Abstract

    Surprisingly, although the Israeli government adopted unregulated, unorganized, inefficient, uncoordinated, and uninformed governance arrangements during the first wave of COVID-19, the public health outcome was successful, a paradox that this theoretically informed article seeks to explain. Drawing on insights from blame avoidance literature, it develops and applies

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  • 1 Dec 2021 Journal Article Political Psychology

    Religion and Democratic Commitment: A Unifying Motivational Framework

    Abstract

    There is no easy answer to the question of whether religiosity promotes or hinders commitment to democracy. Earlier research largely pointed to religiosity as a source of antidemocratic orientations. More recent empirical evidence is less conclusive, however, suggesting that the effect of religiosity on democratic commitment could be positive, negative, or null. We

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  • 17 Nov 2021 Journal Article West European Politics

    Parliaments and government termination: understanding the confidence relationship

    Reuven Y Hazan, BE Rasch
    Abstract

    The core feature of a parliamentary system is not that governments tend to emerge from the legislatures in some way or another, but their political responsibility to this body. While in only some parliamentary systems the government needs formal support of parliament in order to take office, in all parliamentary systems no government can survive against the will of

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  • 7 Nov 2021 Journal Article Journal of Public Policy

    Deliberate disproportionate policy response: towards a conceptual turn

    Abstract

    Policy scholars tend to view disproportionate policy and its two component concepts – policy over- and underreaction – as either unintentional errors of commission or omission, or nonintentional responses that political executives never intended to implement yet are not executed unknowingly, inadvertently or accidentally. This article highlights a conceptual turn, whereby

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  • 5 Nov 2021 Journal Article Communications

    Whose media are hostile? The spillover effect of interpersonal discussions on media bias perceptions

    Laia Castro-Herrero, David Nicolas Hopmann, Lilach Nir
    Abstract

    Since Eveland and Shah (2003) published their seminal study on the impact of social networks on media bias perceptions in the US, little has been researched about the interpersonal antecedents of hostile media perceptions. In this study we address this gap by investigating the role of safe, or like-minded, political discussions on individuals’ likelihood to perceive

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  • Nov 2021 Journal Article Regulation & Governance

    Editors' Introduction: Has Regulation & Governance made a difference?

    Jodi Short, David Levi-Faur, Sally S Simpson, Eva Thomann, Benjamin Van Rooij
    Abstract

    Regulation & Governance was founded 15 years ago based on a vision and an ambitious set of goals laid out by the founding editors, John Braithwaite, Cary Coglianese, and David Levi-Faur (see their introduction to the first issue: “Can regulation and governance make a difference?”, 2007). Fifteen years later, the current editors of Regulation & Governance, in

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  • 9 Oct 2021 Journal Article New Media & Society

    Does the platform matter? Social media and COVID-19 conspiracy theory beliefs in 17 countries

    Yannis Theocharis, Ana Sofia Cardenal, Soyeon Jin, Toril Aalberg, David Nicolas Hopmann, Jesper Stromback, Laia Castro-Herrero, Frank Esser, Peter Van Aelst, Claes H de Vreese, Nicoleta Corbu, Karolina Koc-Michalska, Jörg Matthes, Christian Schemer, Tamir Sheafer, Sergio Splendore, James Stanyer, Agnieszka Stępińska, Václav Štětka
    Abstract

    While the role of social media in the spread of conspiracy theories has received much attention, a key deficit in previous research is the lack of distinction between different types of platforms. This study places the role of social media affordances in facilitating the spread of conspiracy beliefs at the center of its enquiry. We examine the relationship between

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  • Oct 2021 Journal Article Government Information Quarterly

    Not all undecided voters are alike: Evidence from an Israeli election

    Moran Yarchi, Gadi Wolfsfeld, Tal Samuel-Azran
    Abstract

    The literature dealing with undecided voters – a growing group of citizens in many democracies that can determine who wins in election campaigns – suggests two very different profiles. The first approach describes undecided voters as being generally uninformed about politics, while the second sees undecideds as sophisticated citizens who follow a campaign closely before

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  • Oct 2021 Journal Article Political Communication

    Strategy News Is Good News: How Journalistic Coverage of Politics Reduces Affective Polarization

    Abstract

    What role does news content play in explaining inter-party hostility? We argue that affective polarization is influenced by exposure to one of the most dominant ways to cover politics: strategy coverage. While previous studies have pointed to the negative consequences of covering politicians’ strategies and campaign tactics, we find that this reporting style decreases

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  • 27 Sep 2021 Journal Article Party Politics

    The importance of attachment to an ideological group in multi-party systems: Evidence from Israel

    Odelia Oshri, Omer Yair, Leonie Huddy
    Abstract

    In this research, we examine the role of attachment to an ideological group as a source of stability in a volatile multi-party system. In two studies conducted in Israel (N = 1320), we show that a multi-item Attachment to an Ideological Group (AIG) scale is strongly tied to vote choice and political engagement, and its effects are independent of, and more powerful than

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  • 23 Sep 2021 Journal Article Plos One

    Personalism or party platform? Gender quotas and women's representation under different electoral system orientations

    Aliza Forman-Rabinovici, Lilach Nir
    Abstract

    Underrepresentation of women in politics is a matter of great concern to social scientists, citizens, and policymakers alike. Despite effort over the past decade to ameliorate it with gender quotas of different types, scientific research provides a mixed picture on the extent to which quotas can close these gender gaps under different conditions. We approach this puzzle

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  • 18 Sep 2021 Journal Article Public Administration Review

    The Intersectionality of Deservingness For State Support

    Michaela Assouline, Sharon Gilad
    Abstract

    Studies of the ramifications of client race and ethnicity for bureaucrats’ judgments treat minority status as homogenous. Yet, individual identity does not boil down to race or ethnicity. Members of racial and ethnic minority groups likely vary in their experiences and capacity to overcome the negative sentiments and stereotypes that burden their inherited group. To

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  • 16 Sep 2021 Preprint Social Science Research Network

    From Institutional Tipping Points to Affective and Direct Tips: Nonlinear Political Dynamics in East Germany, 1989–1990

    Abstract

    Studies concerning nonlinear political dynamics, such as regime change, focus on macro-level structural factors and political agency. Tipping points are pitched mainly at these levels, and scholars therefore devote less attention to meso-level factors. To bridge this gap, the current paper develops a verbal model that focuses on the collapse of mechanisms sustaining

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  • 15 Sep 2021 Journal Article Islam and Christian–Muslim Relations

    Heterodox Christianity, Unitarianism and the Harmonization of Monotheism: The ‘Heresy’ of Khrīsṭufūrus Jibāra in Nineteenth-Century Syria

    Abstract

    The article sheds light on the intellectual biography and theology of Khrīsṭufūrus Jibāra (d. 1901), a Christian Eastern Orthodox archimandrite who had a falling out with the church because of his controversial beliefs. Jibāra was born in Damascus and lived in Beirut, Cairo, Moscow, New York and Boston. He believed that harmonization between Christianity, Judaism and

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  • 14 Sep 2021 Journal Article Social Science Research Network

    An Empirical Perspective on Moral Expertise: Evidence from a Global Study of Philosophers

    Abstract

    Are philosophers experts in moral matters? This contested question is as old as philosophy itself and has recently attracted renewed interest. While it is widely accepted that philosophers possess superior analytic abilities regarding moral matters, scholars still debate whether they are also better judgers of moral problems. We contribute to this debate by offering an

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  • 14 Sep 2021 Journal Article Journal of Applied Philosophy

    Cities and Immigration: A Reply

    Abstract

    In my book, Cities and Immigration, I suggest shifting responsibilities for the integration of immigrants from the state to the city level. The articles in this issue challenge some of my suggestions. I discuss these challenges with regard to three questions: should a city enjoy greater autonomy to decide who, and how many, immigrants should settle within its borders?

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  • 14 Sep 2021 Journal Article Social Science Research Network

    Policy Instrument Interactions in Policy Mixes: Surveying the Conceptual and Methodological Landscape

    Moshe Maor, Michael Howlett
    Abstract


    Resolving a complex policy problem often requires a mix of policy instruments and thus the identification of the most promising instrument combination. However, the relevant terminology of instrument interactions in a policy mix has not been standardized, hindering a straightforward identification of superior instrument combinations. To address this challenge, the chapter… show more


    Resolving a complex policy problem often requires a mix of policy instruments and thus the identification of the most promising instrument combination. However, the relevant terminology of instrument interactions in a policy mix has not been standardized, hindering a straightforward identification of superior instrument combinations. To address this challenge, the chapter defines the terminology necessary for detecting three different possible policy instrument interactions—namely synergistic, counter-productive, and additive effects. It identifies two approaches to analyzing instrument mix effects: the “effect-based” and the “effort-based” methods. It then discusses the practical advantages and limitations of each approach and elaborates on key methodological issues that policy scholars and practitioners face at each step of developing a new policy mix.

  • 13 Sep 2021 Preprint Social Science Research Network

    Self-Interest, Asymmetric Policy Effects, and Democratic Backsliding: Expanding the Analytical Toolbox

    Abstract

    Theoretical models of political agency primarily incorporate elected executives’ self-interest as motivating reelection-seeking behavior, which, in turn, keeps these politicians in check. A concerning trend of democratic backsliding highlights that these models fail to capture variations in the intensity of self-interest motivations and their effects, especially the

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  • Sep 2021 Journal Article Journal of Law and Courts

    Latent Judicial Intervention: The Case of Self-Claiming Palestinian Informers

    Abstract

    How do judicial techniques enable courts to have a very effective impact on actual national policy while avoiding making binding decisions? Previous academic studies have mostly focused on the controversial capacity (and willingness) of courts to intervene in a country's policy through statutory interpretation or authoritative decisions. We show that by refraining from

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  • 27 Aug 2021 Journal Article Research Handbook on International Law and Cities

    Urbanizing political concepts for analyzing politics in the city

    Abstract

    How does theorizing of fundamental political concepts change when theoretical primacy is accorded to the social and institutional form of the city instead of the state? Given the changing and increasingly central role that cities play in private and social lives, this chapter suggests a reconsideration of the theoretical concepts commonly applied in analyzing cities’

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  • Aug 2021 Journal Article Brain and Behavior

    A motivational framework of acculturation

    Abstract

    A key distinction in motivational processes is between motivations and the means for pursuing motivations. Despite being a motivated process, existing models of acculturation do not make this distinction, neither empirically nor theoretically. A motivational framework that is informed by theories of goal constructs to understand the process of acculturation is proposed

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  • 23 Jul 2021 Book Chapter Political Philosophy in a Pandemic Routes to a More Just Future

    Risk, Disadvantage and the COVID-19 Crisis

    Jonathan Wolff, Avner de Shalit
    Abstract

    Jonathan Wolff Avner de-Shalit The purpose of this chapter is to apply the framework set out in our earlier work Disadvantage (2007) to aspects of the COVID-19 crisis. By doing this we aim to highlight some key social vulnerabilities in a stark light, in order to aid thinking about how to prevent or remedy some of the worst inequalities that have been magnified in these

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  • 21 Jul 2021 Journal Article Digital Journalism

    Does a Crisis Change News Habits? A Comparative Study of the Effects of COVID-19 on News Media Use in 17 European Countries

    Peter Van Aelst, Fanni Toth, Laia Castro-Herrero, Václav Štětka, Claes H de Vreese, Toril Aalberg, Ana Sofia Cardenal, Nicoleta Corbu, Frank Esser, David Nicolas Hopmann, Karolina Koc-Michalska, Jörg Matthes, Christian Schemer, Tamir Sheafer, Sergio Splendore, James Stanyer, Agnieszka Stępińska, Jesper Stromback, Yannis Theocharis
    Abstract

    Exogenous shocks like the COVID-19 pandemic unleashes multiple fundamental questions about society beyond public health. Based on the classical concept of ‘need for orientation’ and the literature on the role of the media in times of crisis, we investigate to what extent the COVID-19 pandemic affected news consumption in comparative perspective. Based on a two-wave

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  • 20 Jul 2021 Journal Article Intellectual History Review

    Adam Smith and the idea of free government

    Abstract

    This article reconstructs Adam Smith’s contribution to the conversation on the nature and value of free government in the eighteenth century. Smith contributes to this conversation in two ways. First, by embedding the idea of free government in a narrative of the progress of government, which traces the interplay between natural progress and social circumstances, and

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  • Jul 2021 Journal Article Cambridge University Press

    Georg Simmel and German Culture: Unity, Variety and Modern Discontents

    Abstract

    The significance of the German philosopher and social thinker, Georg Simmel (1858–1918), is only now being recognised by intellectual historians. Through penetrating readings of Simmel's thought, taken as a series of reflections on the essence of modernity and modern civilisation, Efraim Podoksik places his ideas within the context of intellectual life in Germany, and

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  • Jul 2021 Journal Article The Spectrum of International Institutions

    Theorizing regulatory intermediaries: The RIT model

    Kenneth W Abbott, David Levi-Faur, Duncan Snidal
    Abstract

    Regulation is typically conceived as a two-party relationship between a rule-maker or regulator (R) and a rule-taker or target (T). We set out an agenda for the study of regulation as a three- (or more) party relationship, with intermediaries (I) at the center of the analysis. Intermediaries play major and varied roles in regulation, from providing expertise and feedback

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  • 1 Jul 2021 Journal Article Communication Research

    Does Interpersonal Discussion Increase Political Knowledge? A Meta-Analysis

    Abstract

    Theorists have long argued that discussing public affairs with others increases citizens’ knowledge of politics. Yet, empirical tests of this claim reach contradictory results, with some studies reporting large effects of discussion on knowledge while others report small effects or fail to confirm the hypothesis. To account for this inconsistency, the current study

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  • 1 Jul 2021 Journal Article Gestion Y Politica Publica

    Regulation at the Cross-roads: A Conversation

    Mauricio I Dussauge Laguna, Martin Lodge, Sharon Gilad, Salvador Parrado, Andrea Mennicken, Bruno Queiroz Cunha
    Abstract

    This article is an edited version of the roundtable that took place at the Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas (CIDE) in Mexico City, June 6th, 2018. Based on a set of key questions about regulation as a field of studies with implications for public administration, public management and public policies, as well as a fundamental activity of multiple organizations

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  • 30 Jun 2021 Journal Article Australasian Philosophical Review

    Political Philosophy and What People Think

    Abstract

    In a democracy what people think matters. Political philosophers are mostly democrats. They often justify deliberative and participatory democracy. And yet when it comes to philosophizing they often turn a blind eye to what people think; they sometimes even express profound doubts about what people think and about consulting the public. I call this the political philosophy gap

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  • 30 Jun 2021 Journal Article Australasian Philosophical Review

    Public Reflective Equilibrium: A Reply

    Abstract

    I would like to begin by expressing my sincere and profound thanks to all those who suggested criticism and comments to my paper. As I write this reply, like many around the world, I am at home, in the bizarre situation that has been imposed on us by the Coronavirus pandemic; or, to be more precise, imposed by governments due to the Coronavirus pandemic. Various

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  • 16 Jun 2021 Journal Article Asian Journal of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies

    Separation of State and Religion: The East Asian Model and The Middle East

    Abstract

    East Asia (the post-Confucian countries) is by far more advanced than the Middle East, primarily in terms of better education, leadership quality and population control – for which East Asia ranks at the top of the world’s list (and the Middle East at the bottom). In an attempt to trace the origins of this gap, this article concentrates on one issue: the separation

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  • 3 Jun 2021 Journal Article History, Casuistry and Custom in the Legal Thought of Francisco Suárez (1548-1617)

    Between Aristotle and Scotus

    Abstract

    Deontological defenders of retributivism about punishment believe that there is something intrinsically good about bad things happening to bad people, even if no additional good will follow.1 Some of them also believe that society, through its legal institutions, has a duty to punish criminals. As Kant famously stated that ‘Even if a civil society were to dissolve itself

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  • 26 May 2021 Journal Article The Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics

    Regulatory Governance: History, Theories, Strategies, and Challenges

    Abstract

    Regulation, that is, rulemaking, rule monitoring, and rule enforcement, is both a key policy and legal instrument and a pillar of the institutions that demarcate political, social, and economic lives. It is commonly defined as a sustained and focused control mechanism over valuable activities using direct and indirect rules. Most frequently, regulation is associated

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  • 13 May 2021 Journal Article Journal of Political Science Education

    Distance Breeds Alienation: Perceived Ideological Distance Lowers Students’ Evaluations of Their Professors

    Abstract

    Teaching social sciences frequently involves politically and ideologically fraught issues. This study examines the effect of students’ perceived ideological distance from their professors on their academic experience, drawing on a survey of 1,257 students from Social Science and Law faculties in Israel across five different universities. Congruent with previous findings

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  • 11 May 2021 Journal Article The International Journal of Press/Politics

    Navigating High-choice European Political Information Environments: A Comparative Analysis of News User Profiles and Political Knowledge

    Laia Castro-Herrero, Jesper Stromback, Frank Esser, Peter Van Aelst, Claes H de Vreese, Toril Aalberg, Ana Sofia Cardenal, Nicoleta Corbu, David Nicolas Hopmann, Karolina Koc-Michalska, Jörg Matthes, Christian Schemer, Tamir Sheafer, Sergio Splendore, James Stanyer, Agnieszka Stępińska, Václav Štětka, Yannis Theocharis
    Abstract

    The transition from low- to high-choice media environments has had far-reaching implications for citizens’ media use and its relationship with political knowledge. However, there is still a lack of comparative research on how citizens combine the usage of different media and how that is related to political knowledge. To fill this void, we use a unique cross-national

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  • 3 May 2021 Journal Article The Review of Politics

    Adam Smith on Impartial Patriotism

    Abstract

    Scholars have emphasized Adam Smith's critique of the dangers of patriotism, but have not paid close attention to its potential value. This article recovers from Smith's work an attractive model of patriotism without nationalism. The potential value of patriotism lies in inspiring individuals to realize an ideal of impartial beneficence, which consists in overcoming

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  • May 2021 Journal Article European Political Science Review

    Story incentive: the effect of national stories on voter turnout

    Shaul R Shenhav, Tamir Sheafer, Alon Zoizner, Anita M J van Hoof, Jan Kleinnijenhuis, Yael Rivkah Kaplan, David Nicolas Hopmann
    Abstract

    This article contends that an important driver of turnout is the national stories embraced by citizens. We suggest the notion of ‘story incentive,’ whereby adopting a group’s story components – those that connect the past, the future, and prominent national characters – motivates individuals to participate in that group’s political activities. Leaning on narrative

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  • May 2021 Journal Article International Studies Perspectives

    Studying International Relations through Horror Films: A New Approach and Illustrations from Cannon Fodder and Freak Out

    Abstract

    This paper argues that works of popular culture, specifically horror films, offer valuable insights into dominant and critical perceptions of the sources of violence in ongoing armed conflicts—an issue of concern for scholars of International Relations (IR) scholars, which as yet has not received sufficient attention. Accordingly, we present a new approach that IR

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  • May 2021 Journal Article Party Politics

    The collective memory of dominant parties in parliamentary discourse

    Reut Itzkovitch-Malka, Shaul R Shenhav, Gideon Rahat, Reuven Y Hazan
    Abstract

    When the past is contested by political actors, it can play a notable role both in present and in future politics. This is especially true when it comes to the memory of dominant parties, which are part and parcel of political and national history. Focusing on dominant parties in parliamentary democracies, this article examines the memory dynamics of a dominant party

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  • 1 May 2021 Journal Article Social Science Research Network

    Majority Nationalism Laws and the Equal Citizenship of Minorities: Experimental, Panel, and Cross-Sectional Evidence from Israel

    Netta Barak-Corren, Noam Gidron, Yuval Feldman
    Abstract

    Western societies are increasingly enacting majority nationalism laws to strengthen majority culture. We propose that these laws may alter public attitudes about minorities’ equal citizenship with varied impact on majorities and minorities. To explore this issue, we examine the impact of Israel’s recently enacted Nation Law on the Jewish majority and the Arab minority

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  • 28 Apr 2021 Preprint Social Science Research Network

    The Pitkinian Public: Representation in the Eyes of Citizens

    Liron Lavi, Clareta Treger, Naama Rivlin-Angert, Tamir Sheafer, Israel Waismel-Manor, Shaul R Shenhav, Liran Harsgor, Michal Shamir
    Abstract

    What does it mean for citizens in democracies to be represented? Does it even matter? Representation theories and studies have mostly emphasized the representatives, giving only limited attention to the represented. In this paper, we address this lacuna by adopting Hanna Pitkin’s multidimensionality of representation and the act-for/stand-for tiered structure she posits

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  • 23 Apr 2021 Journal Article Journal of European Public Policy

    Foregone and predicted futures: challenges of opportunity cost neglect and impact bias for public participation in policymaking

    Abstract

    Deliberative democracy fosters greater involvement of the public in policymaking. However, psychological challenges involved in eliciting policy preferences receive little attention in this context. This study addresses the implications of opportunity cost neglect (OCN) and impact bias for policy preferences. Utilizing a survey experiment among residents of peripheral

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  • Apr 2021 Book Chapter The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    Arab Citizens in the “Jewish” State of Israel

    Abstract

    Israel’s Declaration of Independence proclaims full equality for all of Israel’s citizens and calls upon members of the Arab nation “to participate in the upbuilding of the State on the basis of full and equal citizenship.” This pledge has not been kept. On the one hand, the government is using its majority to legislate laws that undermine the status and legitimacy of

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  • Apr 2021 Journal Article The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    Bureaucratic Politics in Israel

    Sharon Gilad, Nissim Cohen
    Abstract

    Studies of the Israeli public sector point to the vast influence of the Ministry of Finance (MOF) across multiple policy domains. This chapter combines bureaucratic politics research and the notion of veto players to theorize a two-tiered power game between bureaucratic and political players. It argues that the policy influence of bureaucracies is shaped by stable

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  • Apr 2021 Book Chapter The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    Electoral Behavior in Israel

    Assaf Shapira, Gideon Rahat
    Abstract

    This chapter reviews, analyzes, and explains general patterns of electoral behavior in national elections in Israel from 1949 to 2019. It examines both patterns of voter turnout and the choice of a specific party. While it looks at historical trends, it focuses mainly on more recent developments. The types of factors that explain variance and trends in these behavioral

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  • Apr 2021 Journal Article The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    Introduction to Israeli Politics and Society

    Abstract

    Few countries receive as much attention as Israel and are at the same time as misunderstood. The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society brings together the leading Israeli and international figures in order to offer the most wide-ranging treatment available of an intriguing country. This chapter tackles the issue of Israeli exceptionalism, arguing against those

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  • Apr 2021 Book Chapter The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    Israel’s Policy in and toward the West Bank and the Gaza Strip

    Abstract

    This chapter discusses Israel's policy in and toward the West Bank (and East Jerusalem) and the Gaza Strip from the Six-Day War (1967), when Israel occupied these areas, to the present. Although the focus here is on the political-security realm, other spheres (eg, economic, social, and cultural-discursive) are also addressed. The first part of the chapter discusses

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  • Apr 2021 Journal Article The Journal of Politics

    Permissibility of Electoral Systems: A New Look at an Old Question

    Orit Kedar, Liran Harsgor, Or Tuttnauer
    Abstract

    Permissibility of electoral systems, and in particular the conversion of voices in the electorate to the legislature, is broadly considered to depend on the number of seats per district (district magnitude) in a country. Yet the most prevalent electoral system in the democratic world, proportional representation with districts, is often characterized by an almost entirely

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  • Apr 2021 Journal Article The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    Political Communication and Israeli Politics

    Dana Markowitz-Elfassi, Tamir Sheafer, Yariv Tsfati, Gabriel Weimann, Gadi Wolfsfeld
    Abstract

    This chapter presents a critical discussion of the symbiosis between media and politics in Israel. Theoretically, the Israeli media operate in a pluralistic, democratic, and advanced sociopolitical climate, but in fact most of the media suffer from fragmentation, economic instability, and heavy political pressures. These elements are reflected, for example, in homogeneous

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  • Apr 2021 Book Chapter The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    Political Reform in Israel

    Abstract

    Israel has experienced both failed and successful attempts to reform its democratic institutions in the seventy years since its founding. The most noteworthy failure has been in the promotion of much-needed electoral reform that would moderate the “extreme” features of the hyper-representative, party-centered electoral system. Successes range from small modifications

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  • Apr 2021 Book Chapter The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    The Judicial Branch in Israel

    Menachem Hofnung, Mohammed Saif-Alden Wattad
    Abstract

    The contemporary perception of Israel’s judiciary as an independent branch does not coincide with Israel’s first government’s perception after establishing the first Supreme Court. To a great extent the executive branch deemed the court its long arm. Until the mid-1950s judges were appointed by the government, and questions of conflicts of interest and political

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  • Apr 2021 Book Chapter The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    The Legislative Branch in Israel

    Abstract

    The Knesset is the legislative body of Israel, which has been a parliamentary, unitary democracy since its foundation. It is a unicameral parliament, elected through a proportional election system that to a great extent reflects Israeli society. Because there is no written constitution, the Knesset alone delineates the three branches of government. On top of its

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  • Apr 2021 Book

    The Oxford handbook of Israeli politics and society

    Abstract

    Few countries receive as much attention as Israel and are at the same time as misunderstood. The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society brings together leading Israeli and international figures to offer the most wide-ranging treatment available of an intriguing country. It serves as a comprehensive reference for the growing field of Israel studies and is also

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  • Apr 2021 Journal Article The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    The Political Economy of Israeli Neoliberalism

    Ronen Mandelkern, Michael Shalev
    Abstract

    Israel’s political economy has been transformed since the 1980s from a developmental to a neoliberal model. This chapter describes and explains this transformation, emphasizing the unevenness and incompleteness of liberalization and its impact on socioeconomic inequality. Adopting a historical-institutionalist perspective to explain both the rise of Israeli neoliberalism

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  • 1 Apr 2021 Book Chapter The Oxford Handbook of Israeli Politics and Society

    Parties and the Party System of Israel

    Abstract

    Both the parties and the party system of Israel have undergone significant changes during the last seventy years. This chapter begins by delineating the transformation of the political parties in Israel, from classic mass parties to a plethora of types that coexist somewhat uneasily, and from parties focused on domestic socioeconomic issues to ones dominated by foreign

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  • 15 Mar 2021 Journal Article International Review of Public Policy

    Protecting Rights in the Policy Process: Integrating Legal Proportionality and Policy Analysis

    Abstract

    This paper provides an integrative analysis of legal proportionality and policy analysis, and identifies the inherent potential of integrating the proportionality principle in policy analysis for enhancing the protection of rights in the policy process. Our analysis entails three key recommendations: (1) Mandating the inclusion of a rights-impact criterion in policy

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  • 9 Mar 2021 Journal Article West European Politics

    The vote of no confidence: towards a framework for analysis

    Abstract

    The core feature of parliamentary democracy is government responsibility to the legislature. The most important instrument by which parliament can express its lack of support for the government is the vote of no confidence. This mechanism remains significantly under-studied, and research on votes of no confidence calls out for systematic attention. It is also timely

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  • Mar 2021 Journal Article Computational Communication Research

    A Weakly Supervised and Deep Learning Method for an Additive Topic Analysis of Large Corpora

    Abstract

    The collaborative effort of theory-driven content analysis can benefit significantly from the use of topic analysis methods, which allow researchers to add more categories while developing or testing a theory. This additive approach enables the reuse of previous efforts of analysis or even the merging of separate research projects, thereby making these methods more

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  • Mar 2021 Book Chapter The Routledge Handbook of Policy Styles

    Policy over- and underreaction as policy styles

    Abstract

    Do certain issues or governments tend to reproduce consistently either policy underreactions or policy overreactions? This chapter elaborates on the psychological and institutional explanations that can account for unintentional policy over- and underreaction styles and the strategic explanations that can account for their intentional counterparts. The arguments advanced

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  • Mar 2021 Book Chapter The Oxford Handbook of Intergenerational Ethics

    The Community, the Nation, and Obligations to Future Generations

    Abstract

    Prima facie one’s obligations to the nation and to future generations might clash because of the tension between the particular, the concrete, and the contemporary versus the universal, the abstract, and the future-oriented. However, the nation is and should be regarded as an intergenerational community; this mode of thinking, called here “thinking like a nation,” yields

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