Apartheid—The Global Itinerary
Apartheid—The Global Itinerary
South African Cultural Formations in Transnational Circulation, 1948-1990
Funded by the European Research Council (ERC)
May 2021 PhD Dissertation The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Producing Musical Pan-Africanism: On the Continental Circulation of Music in Postcolonial Africa, 1960s–1990s
Supervisors: Prof. Louise Bethlehem and Prof. Edwin Seroussi
Abstract
This dissertation explores the intersection between music and pan-African ideology in postindependent Africa from 1960 to 1990 by focusing on transnational musical activity that takes place in a regional and continental setting. It analyzes diverse forms of musical pan-Africanism (MPA), including collaborations between musicians from different African countries (eithershow more
Feb 2021 PhD Dissertation The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Globalizing Nkrumaism: Ideological Flows in Cosmopolitan Ghana
Supervisors: Prof. Louise Bethlehem and Prof. Moshe Sluhovsky
Abstract
During Kwame Nkrumah’s years in power (1957-1966), the newly independent state of Ghana became a vibrant cosmopolitan center, drawing politically committed travelers, expatriates, and political exiles, who took an active role in shaping Ghana’s postcolonial project. Ghana’s pronounced cosmopolitanism was a deliberate and significant component of the postcolonial experimentshow more
13 Dec 2020 Book Chapter Apartheid and Anti-Apartheid in Western Europe
The Comic Representation of Apartheid on British Television in the Late 1960s
Abstract
This chapter asks what the comic televisual representation of apartheid in the late 1960s tells us about its perception in Britain, and what it reveals about race relations in the country. To achieve this, this chapter focuses on a single episode from the situation comedy Till Death Us Do Part broadcast on the BBC on 12 January 1968. The chapter illuminates how theshow more
2 Oct 2020 Journal Article English in Africa
‘Remember Sharpeville’: Radical Commemoration in the Poetry of the Exiled South African Poets, Dennis Brutus and Keorapetse Kgositsile
Abstract
The Sharpeville Massacre of 1960 has been widely seen as a watershed moment, marking a fundamental shift in the nature of the resistance to apartheid. Its effect on cultural production was monumental: in the face of a massive government crackdown, almost every black writer and artist of note was forced into exile. The poets who write within the long shadow of the massacreshow more
17 Sep 2020 Journal Article Interventions - International Journal of Postcolonial Studies
Palestinian Non-Violent Resistance and the Apartheid Analogy: Framing Israeli Policy in the 1960s and 1970s
Abstract
Israel/Palestine is a context in which the term “apartheid” keeps reappearing. As a historical analogy and cultural shorthand, it functions as a powerful Palestinian weapon when used to describe Israeli policy and actions in what amounts to a battle of narratives in the international arena. For a long time, Palestinians have been known primarily for their violent struggleshow more
6 Jul 2020 Journal Article Scrutiny2 - Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa
Translation and Untranslatability in the Poetry of Dennis Brutus and Keorapetse Kgositsile
Abstract
This article traces aspects of the history of translation, familiar both in critical works that address South African literature and in South African literary texts, in relation to two poems by the black South African poets Dennis Brutus and Keorapetse Kgositsile. It considers their insinuation of untranslated or translated Afrikaans into an English text as a radicalshow more
4 Mar 2020 Journal Article Critical Arts - South-North Cultural and Media Studies
Celebrity and Protest in the Anti-Apartheid Movement
Abstract
This special issue proposes to juxtapose accounts of anti-apartheid protest and solidarity efforts with the field of celebrity studies in order to deepen our understanding of both through their conjunction. As our contributors show, opponents of apartheid in South Africa and beyond were cognisant of the importance of cultivating ties with local and global media, as wellshow more
Mar 2020 Journal Article Critical Arts
“Trevor is ‘News’”: Celebrity as Protest in the Early Anti-Apartheid Struggle, 1948-1960
Abstract
Celebrity culture was a crucial, though unrecognised, component of the early anti-apartheid struggle. Between 1948 and the foundation of the Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) in Britain in 1960, activists discovered celebrity to be a valuable political tool. The strategic use of celebrity secured media coverage, mobilised support for the struggle, and built a transnationalshow more
Mar 2020 Edited Volume Critical Arts - South-North Cultural and Media Studies
Celebrity and Protest in the Anti-Apartheid Struggle
Abstract
Table of Contents Celebrity and Protest in the Anti-Apartheid Movement Louise Bethlehem & Tal Zalmanovich Nelson Mandela’s “Show Trials”: An Analysis of Press Coverage of Mandela’s Court Appearances Martha Evans “Trevor is ‘News’”: Celebrity as Protest in the Early Anti-Apartheid Struggle, 1948–1960 Tal Zalmanovich Not Merely a Newsworthy Commodity: Jean-Paul Sartre'sshow more
11 Feb 2020 Journal Article Critical Arts - South-North Cultural and Media Studies
Not Merely a Newsworthy Commodity: Jean-Paul Sartre's Engagement in the Struggle Against Apartheid
Abstract
Jean-Paul Sartre's renown and intellectual celebrity grew as a function of his engagement in Third World struggles. Sartre's public image as a champion of the oppressed is so entrenched that it might seem self-evident that he played a leading role in the anti-apartheid struggle. However, his actual contribution to the South African struggle appears to be at odds withshow more
20 Jan 2020 Journal Article Critical Arts - South-North Cultural and Media Studies
Literary Celebrity and Political Activism: Wole Soyinka’s Nobel Prize Lecture and the Anti-Apartheid Struggle
Abstract
In 1986, the Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. This article considers the role of the Nobel Prize in the construction, promotion and cementing of literary celebrity, addressing the ways in which the prize augments Soyinka’s literary and political renown, already substantial at the time of the award. The article takes as its focusshow more
2020 Book Chapter Nachexil / Post-Exile
South African Homecomings
Abstract
In March 1960, the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC) under the leadership of Robert Sobukwe, and the African National Congress (ANC) initiated a national cam-paign against South Africa’s pass laws. Under the provisions of the Pass Act of 19523, severe restrictions had been imposed on the free movement of black South Africans. The bearingshow more
27 Dec 2019 Blog Post
“Apartheid—The Global Itinerary”: The Journey Ends
Abstract
As our research project draws to a close, I thought I would revisit some of its founding assumptions and reflect on its findings and consequences. In my blog entry on this platform (December 2016), I wrote of how I came to the conclusion that: “Apartheid moved things.” Indeed, the conceptual foundations of the research project that emerged there were bound up withshow more
20 Dec 2019 Blog Post
Interview with Kier Schuringa, Dutch Anti-Antipartheid Activist
Abstract
Kier Schuringa served as a full-time activist in the Dutch Anti-Apartheid and southern Africa solidarity movement from the early 1970s until its dissolution in 1994. He subsequently coordinated the Library, Information and Documentation Center of the Netherlands Institute for Southern Africa (NIZA). He joined the International Institute of Social History in 2008, workingshow more
27 Nov 2019 Journal Article Journal of Modern Jewish Studies
South African Text; Zionist Palimpsest: Israeli Critics Read Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country
Abstract
The contemporary mobilization of the apartheid-Israel analogy on the part of activists and academics alike obscures the fact that it has a long history of use on the part of Hebrew-speaking writers and intellectuals. Some of the earliest comparative references to apartheid arose from the Hebrew translation and stage adaptation of Alan Paton’s celebrated 1948 novelshow more
21 Oct 2019 Book Chapter The Battle for International Law: South-North Perspectives on the Decolonization Era
Picking Battles: Race, Decolonization, and Apartheid
Abstract
Race is one of the more ubiquitous, yet least explored, shifts in twentieth-century international law. From law that was founded in key areas and concepts on racial distinctions, international law quickly came to denounce various manifestations of race theories and racial discrimination. The establishment of the UN reflected a racialized understanding of the internationalshow more
27 Sep 2019 Journal Article Journal of Genocide Research
Between Apartheid, the Holocaust and the Nakba: Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s Pilgrimage to Israel-Palestine (1989) and the Emergence of an Analogical Lexicon
Abstract
On 22 December 1989, the anti-apartheid activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, Archbishop Desmond Tutu conducted a Christmas pilgrimage to Israel and the Occupied TerritOn 22 December 1989, the anti-apartheid activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, Archbishop Desmond Tutu conducted a Christmas pilgrimage to Israel and the Occupied Territories. Tutu used his visit toshow more
11 Aug 2019 Blog Post
Looking Back
Abstract
It is difficult to condense my understanding of the contribution of the ERC project, “Apartheid— the Global Itinerary: South African Cultural Formations in Transnational Circulation,” both to my personal development as a researcher, and I hope to the field of South African studies. While the focus of my research has been South African exilic literature, the structuringshow more
8 May 2019 Journal Article Safundi - The Journal of South African and American Studies
Cold War Carceral Liberalism and other Counternarratives: The Case of Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country
Abstract
This article traces a transnational cultural genealogy of postwar and early Cold War liberalism specifically shaped by prisons. Central to this genealogy is Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country, the South African novel that became a metonym for the tradition of South African political liberalism and liberal anti-apartheid fiction. The novel’s carceral aspectsshow more
8 May 2019 Journal Article Safundi - The Journal of South African and American Studies
“What is Needed is an Ecumenical Act of Solidarity:” The World Council of Churches, the 1969 Notting Hill Consultation on Racism, and the Anti-apartheid Struggle
Abstract
This article examines the Notting Hill Consultation on Racism organized by the World Council of Churches (WCC), held in London in May 1969. The meeting framed racism as an urgent global problem. Its innovative “Program to Combat Racism” (PCR) acknowledged the historical complicity and benefit of the Church with imperial conquest. The Program’s special fund for liberationshow more
8 May 2019 Journal Article Safundi - The Journal of South African and American Studies
Stenographic Fictions: Mary Benson’s At the Still Point and the South African Political Trial
Abstract
From the mid-1960s onward, compilations of the speeches and trial addresses of South African opponents of apartheid focused attention on the apartheid regime despite intensified repression in the wake of the Rivonia Trial. Mary Benson’s novel, At the Still Point, transposes the political trial into fiction. Its “stenographic” codes of representation open Benson’sshow more
8 May 2019 Journal Article Special Issue of Safundi - The Journal of South African and American Studies
Cultural Solidarities: Itineraries of Anti-Apartheid Expressive Culture - Introduction to the Special Issue
Abstract
Continuing the investigation of networked cultural responses in the Global South construed as “cultural solidarities” that was embarked upon in the first special issue of this two-part series, “Cultural Solidarities: Apartheid and the anti-colonial commons of world literature,” Safundi Vol. 19, no.3, the introduction to this, its second volume, investigates howshow more
8 May 2019 Journal Article Safundi - The Journal of South African and American Studies
From Moscow with Love: Soviet Cultural Politics across India in the Cold War
Abstract
One of the less researched aspects of postcolonial India’s “progressive” culture is its Soviet connection. Starting in the 1950s and consolidating in the 1960s, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics invested in building up “committed” networks amongst writers, directors, actors, and other theater- and film-practitioners across India. Thus, an entire generation ofshow more
May 2019 Edited Volume Safundi - The Journal of South African and American Studies
Cultural Solidarities: Itineraries of Anti-Apartheid Expressive Culture
Abstract
Table of Contents Cultural solidarities: itineraries of anti-apartheid expressive culture—introduction to the special issue Louise Bethlehem, Lindelwa Dalamba & Uhuru Phalafala Cold War carceral liberalism and other counternarratives: the case of Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country Sarika Talve-Goodman “What is needed is an ecumenical act of solidarity:” the Worldshow more
30 Apr 2019 Blog Post
Apartheid Trials and Human Rights Histories
Abstract
In 2010, Samuel Moyn’s The Last Utopia argued for a very short history of human rights. Against the grain of celebratory accounts of the rise of human rights, Moyn dated their birth to the 1970s. To support his claim of extreme discontinuity, Moyn demonstrated why earlier episodes, concepts, or vocabularies were not and could not be about human rights. ‘The dramashow more
25 Apr 2019 Journal Article African Identities
Ahmed Kathrada in Post-war Europe: Holocaust Memory and Apartheid South Africa (1951-1952)
Abstract
This paper is part of a larger study exploring cultural and discursive performances of Holocaust memory in South Africa under the apartheid racist regime (1948–1994). During the years of apartheid rule, South Africans of diverse backgrounds regularly invoked the memory of the Holocaust. In his 2004 memoirs, the Indian South African anti-apartheid activist Ahmed Kathradashow more
Apr 2019 MA Thesis The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
“Love in Terms of Hate”: Interracial Intimacy in the Works of Peter Abrahams and Chester Himes
Supervisor: Prof. Louise Bethlehem
Abstract
Throughout the twentieth century, interracial intimacies have been an especially dense and contentious theme in protest writing by authors of color. These relationships are often represented as indicative of the race problem of society at large. As such, the theme is commonly politicized for purposes of social critique and for advocating social change. This paper seeksshow more
Mar 2019 PhD Dissertation Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Remembering the Holocaust in a Racial State: Cultural and Discursive Aspects of Holocaust Memory in South Africa from Apartheid to Democracy (1948-1994)
Supervisors: Prof. Louise Bethlehem and Prof. Amos Goldberg
Abstract
This study seeks to explore cultural and discursive performances of Holocaust memory in South Africa during the apartheid years and during the transition to democracy (1948-1994). It focuses on local Jewish investment in commemorating the Holocaust under apartheid rule and reveals a fascinating case of a diasporic community in an ambivalent state, which I address as ashow more
3 Feb 2019 The Conversation: Africa
The story of an alliance between two poets – one Cuban, one South African
Abstract
It’s a little more than a year since the death of Keorapetse Kgositsile, South Africa’s first post-apartheid poet laureate. Kgositsile, born in Johannesburg in 1938, became a prominent and vocal activist for the African National Congress (ANC). In 1961, at the behest of the ANC, he went into exile, initially to Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, and subsequently to the US whereshow more
2019 Edited Volume Safundi - The Journal of South African and American Studies
Cultural Solidarities: Apartheid and the Anticolonial Commons of World Literature
Abstract
Table of Contents Cultural solidarities: apartheid and the anticolonial commons of world literature Stefan Helgesson, Louise Bethlehem & Gül Bilge Han Addressing an Afro-Asian public: Alex La Guma’s report to the 25th anniversary conference of the Afro-Asian Writers Association in 1983 Christopher J. Lee & Alex La Guma Nazım Hikmet’s Afro-Asian solidarities Gül Bilgeshow more
2019 Book Chapter Exlibris
A Crossed Voice: Nancy Morejón's Poetic Journey to South African Apartheid (Spanish)
Abstract
The article examines the circulation of speeches against South African apartheid (1948-1990) in the literary and cultural sphere in Cuba and Latin America, taking as a case study two texts by the Afro-Caribbean author Nancy Morejón: the poetry book Baladas para un Sueño (1989) and the essay-chronicle Trip to South Africa ​​(1995). These texts haveshow more
2 Oct 2018 Journal Article Critical Arts - South-North Cultural and Media Studies
Screening Solidarity in Late 1960s Britain: Racism, Anti-Apartheid, and a Televised Debate
Abstract
In October 1969, a debate between anti-apartheid activist Bishop Trevor Huddleston and Tory MP Enoch Powell was broadcast on British television. It presented viewers with opposing ideas about immigration, dignity and duty. This article claims that Huddleston's invocation of apartheid as an extreme case of racism turned the debate into a key moment for educating Britonsshow more
1 Sep 2018 Journal Article Social Text
Restless Itineraries: Antiapartheid Expressive Culture and Transnational Historiography
Abstract
This article sets the itineracy of antiapartheid expressive culture to work in relation to exiled South African jazz singer Miriam Makeba. It revisits accounts of transnational cultural circulation on the part of Rob Nixon, Paul Gilroy, and others to argue that the diffusion of South African cultural formations outward from South Africa offers historiographic tractionshow more
31 Aug 2018 Blog Post
Moses Tladi: Painting Homesickness
Abstract
In 1929, at the tenth annual exhibition of the South African Academy held in Johannesburg, eight works by Moses Tladi (1903-1959) were displayed. Two years later, in 1931, two of his landscape paintings were included in the exhibition that formally opened the South African National Gallery in Cape Town. In both instances Tladi was the first black painter to have hisshow more
17 Aug 2018 Journal Article Interventions - International Journal of Postcolonial Studies
Guinea Unbound: Performing Pan-African Cultural Citizenship between Algiers 1969 and the Guinean National Festivals
Abstract
This article seeks to reassess the role of pan-Africanism within the national imagination of postcolonial Guinea under the presidency of Ahmed Sékou Touré. By focusing on the interplay between transnational and national dynamics within two cultural festivals – the First Pan-African Cultural Festival of Algiers in 1969 and the Guinean National Festival – pan-Africanismshow more
14 Aug 2018 Blog Post
'Shir Cushi”: African-American Spirituals "Making Alyia" to Israel during the 1950's
Abstract
The third podcast featured on this blog is a recording of Noa Ben-Sadia's presentation (given in Hebrew), titled "Shir Cushi”: African-American Spirituals "Making Alyia" to Israel during the 1950's'. The presentation was given on June 25th, 2018, at the "Minheret HaZman" conference, hosted at Beit Berl College. Ben-Sadia discusses the arrival of negro-spirituals intoshow more
2 Aug 2018 Edited Volume Safundi - The Journal of South African and American Studies
Cultural Solidarities: Apartheid and the Anticolonial Commons of World Literature
Abstract
Table of Contents Cultural solidarities: preamble Louise Bethlehem, Lindelwa Dalamba, Gül Bilge Han, Stefan Helgesson & Uhuru Phalafala Cultural solidarities: apartheid and the anticolonial commons of world literature Stefan Helgesson, Louise Bethlehem & Gül Bilge Han Addressing an Afro-Asian public: Alex La Guma’s report to the 25th anniversary conference of theshow more
2 Aug 2018 The Conversation: Africa
How resistance led to London’s Selous Street becoming Mandela Street
Abstract
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex recently attended the opening of “Nelson Mandela: The Centenary Exhibition” in London. It was one of many global events to celebrate Mandela’s 100th birthday and his legacy. What shouldn’t be forgotten is that establishment support for Mandela and the struggle he represented was not unanimous during the apartheid years. For example, undershow more
2 Aug 2018 Journal Article Special Issue of Safundi - The Journal of South African and American Studies
Cultural Solidarities: Apartheid and the Anticolonial Commons of World Literature - Introduction to the Special Issue
Abstract
This special issue considers networked cultural responses loosely figured as “cultural solidarities” in the Global South, on the understanding that mid-twentieth century struggles to end colonialism were addressed within a transnational domain. It takes apartheid South Africa as its point of departure, positioning literature from South Africa within a broadly anti-colonialshow more
27 Jul 2018 Journal Article Interventions - International Journal of Postcolonial Studies
The Musical Diplomacy of a Landless Ambassador: Hugh Masekela between Monterey ’67 and Zaire ’74
Abstract
This essay attempts to locate the music festival known as Zaire ’74 within a continuum of Pan-African festivals by reading it as an ‘idiosyncratic laboratory’ in relation to the agency of exiled South African jazz musician Hugh Masekela. Masekela was one of the producers of the 1974 event held in Kinshasa. Yet his expertise here draws on his prior participation in theshow more
17 Jul 2018 The Conversation: Africa
Centenary of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela’s Birth: a Tribute in Poems
Abstract
The centenary of the birth of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela offers a rich opportunity to reflect on the life of South Africa’s extraordinary political leader and on the legacies of the struggle against apartheid that he and his cohort of fellow activists shaped. Mandela’s life-writing offers a great deal of inspiration for such reflection across a range of themes, includingshow more
12 Mar 2018 Blog Post
Apartheid, Jewish Identity, and Early Israeli Foreign Policy
Abstract
Works dealing with Israel’s African policy, or with its relations with South Africa, commonly argue that ‘in the 1960s Israel took part in the international struggle against apartheid’. Such claims point to Israel’s votes in the United Nations (UN) and, often, to Foreign Minister Golda Meir’s speeches at the world organisation. In these speeches, Meir invoked Israel’sshow more
11 Feb 2018 The Conversation: Africa
How Masekela’s Journeys in Exile Shaped His Music and Politics
Abstract
The world continues to pay tribute to the legendary Hugh Ramapolo Masekela who died on 23 January 2018. His journeys have reminded us that the itineraries of South African exiles — writers, journalists, performers, photographers, and political activists — have much to offer transnational histories of anti-apartheid resistance. Masekela knew some formative moments duringshow more
31 Jan 2018 Journal Article The English Historical Review
Negotiating Identity: Israel, Apartheid, and the United Nations, 1949-1952
Abstract
Orthodox historiographies on Israel’s early policies in ‘black’ Africa and its relations with ‘white’ South Africa commonly, if disjointedly, assert that the state’s Jewish identity had played, in the early 1960s, a key role in Israel’s participation in the international ‘struggle against apartheid’. Revisiting this assertion, I examine Israel’s involvement in earlyshow more
2018 Journal Article Vienna Journal of African Studies
From Apartheid South Africa to Socialist Budapest and Back: Communism, Race, and Cold War Journeys
Abstract
This article reveals the communist transnational infrastructure that connected South African communists with socialist regimes in the early 1950s. Before the establishment of a global anti-apartheid movement after Sharpeville, this network enabled the circulation of people and ideas outward from South Africa. Communist education and institutions in the country openedshow more
10 Nov 2017 Journal Article Social Dynamics - A journal of African studies
“Miriam’s Place”: South African Jazz, Conviviality and Exile
Abstract
Michael Titlestad has suggested that jazz serves “to mediate, manage and contest” what he terms a “staggered, but also cruel and unusual South African modernity.” His volume Making the Changes (2004) uses the “pedestrian” as a chronotope to describe the “local peripatetic appropriations of global symbolic possibilities” that jazz affords there. This paper proposesshow more
10 Nov 2017 Journal Article Social Dynamics - A journal of African studies
Zaire ’74: Politicising the Sound Event
Abstract
This article focuses on the multidimensional sound event in order to articulate certain transnational vectors of political power, anti-imperialism and black power. It proceeds from Louise Bethlehem’s research methodology which recasts the anti-apartheid struggle as an apparatus of transnational cultural production through charting the movement of texts, sounds and imagesshow more
10 Nov 2017 Journal Article Social Dynamics - A journal of African studies
Playing the Backbeat in Conakry: Miriam Makeba and the Cultural Politics of Sékou Touré’s Guinea, 1968-1986
Abstract
This article revisits the cultural history of Guinea in the three decades following independence through focusing on the musical activity of Miriam Makeba, the exiled South African singer who resided in the country between the years 1968 and 1986. Recent scholarship has illuminated the vast investment of the Guinean state in developing modern national culture as partshow more
26 Oct 2017 Blog Post
Making History with Music: Miriam Makeba in Guinea
Abstract
Listening to music is not the action most commonly associated with the work of the historian. While the history of music is certainly studied in musicology departments, music is rarely considered a legitimate source for studying non-musical social and cultural dynamics. After all, music does not convey meaning in the way words do: it often does not seem to have a concreteshow more
25 Oct 2017 Journal Article Planning Perspectives
South African ‘Know-How’ and Israeli ‘Facts of Life’: The Planning of Afridar, Ashkelon, 1949-1956
Abstract
In 1949, in the newly founded state of Israel, South African architects Norman Hanson and Roy Kantorowich planned the city of Ashkelon and, within it, the exclusive neighbourhood unit Afridar. Managed by the South African Jewish Appeal, which initiated and funded the project, Afridar presented a radical exception to Israel’s centralized planning approach during thatshow more
Jun 2017 Blog Post
Reflections on a Feminist Now in Places of Undying Colonialism
Abstract
The recent conference staged as a collaboration between our ERC project, APARTHEID-STOPS, The World Literatures: Cosmopolitan and Vernacular Dynamics Research Programme at Stockholm University and the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research (WiSER) in Johannesburg presented the opportunity for participants to enter into dialogue concerning our different localizedshow more
7 May 2017 Blog Post
Good Hope? South Africa-The Netherlands
Abstract
On the morning of April 9, 2017, I landed in a sunny Amsterdam. After a quick stop at the hotel to drop off my luggage, I set out for the Museumplein where three notable museums are located- the Rijksmuseum, the Van Gogh Museum, and the Stedelijk Museum. Last February, a new exhibition examining the Netherlands' relationship with South Africa over the past 400 yearsshow more
10 Jan 2017 Blog Post
"A Logo Should Tell a Story": The Symbols of Pan-Africanism
Abstract
The threat of commoditization – the process by which commodities lose their singularity and are then regarded in the eyes of consumers as undifferentiated from other similar brands – poses a constant challenge to manufacturers of goods and brings many of them to hire the services of brand designers. They hope that by rebranding their goods, customers will perceive themshow more
4 Dec 2016 Blog Post
Passages: On the Genesis of “Apartheid—The Global Itinerary: South African Cultural Formations in Tr
Abstract
In 1996, Leon de Kock and Ian Tromp published an anthology entitled The Heart in Exile: South African Poetry in English, 1990-1995. The volume included a poem by Denis Hirson, “The Long-Distance South African,” recounting Hirson’s experience of viewing the televised broadcast of Nelson Mandela’s triumphant release from prison at a long geographical remove from Southshow more
Dec 2016 MA Thesis The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
"Shir Cushi": African-American Spirituals During the 1950's and 1960's in Israel
Supervisors: Prof. Ruth HaCohen (Pinczower) and Prof. Louise Bethlehem
Abstract
אפתח בווידוי: מוצאי איננו אפרו-אמריקני, נולדתי וגדלתי בישראל למשפחה יהודית חילונית, אך בדומה לדברים עלי להודות ולהתוודות כי ,)Du Bois( לעיל שכתב בספרו המכונן איש ההגות ויליאם אדוארד בורגהרד דו בויז במהלך כתיבת עבודה זו הפכו שירי הספיריטואלס הרחוקים כל-כך לחלק ממני, וכי גם אותי הם ריגשו באורח מיוחד. שירים אלו מעוררים לעתים קרובות רגשות חזקים בקרב השומעים אותם: זהו חיסרוןshow more
8 Nov 2016 Blog Post
Interviewing Ahmed Kathrada: Inspirational!
Abstract
In the opening paragraph of Shirli Gilbert's (2012) article about representations of Anne Frank in South Africa, she describes how Ahmed Kathrada—an anti-apartheid activist imprisoned for eighteen years on Robben Island—secretly recorded inspiring quotations from The Diary of Anne Frank in his prison notebooks, among other quotations from books and newspapers smuggledshow more
8 Nov 2016 Blog Post
Tracing the Footprints of Ghosts in Johannesburg’s Sophiatown
Abstract
This July, I arrived in Johannesburg for the first time. A historian of Modern Britain, I had recently begun researching British activists who participated in the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa, and their influence on the discourse of race relations in Britain. After several visits to archives in Britain and months poring over documents I had gathered there, Ishow more
12 Jul 2016 Journal Article ABE Journal - Architecture Beyond Europe
Basic Design and the Semiotics of Citizenship: Julian Beinart’s Educational Experiments and Research on Wall Decoration in Early 1960s Nigeria and South Africa
Abstract
From 1961 to 1965, Julian Beinart, an architecture lecturer at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, embarked on a series of basic design workshops in Mozambique, Nigeria, South Africa, Rhodesia, and Kenya. Inspired by his MIT instructors Kevin Lynch and Gyorgy Kepes, Beinart was interested in the development of a new popular visual language, one that wouldshow more
Dec 2015 MA Thesis Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Resistance in Circulation: Zionist and Anti-Zionist Mobilizations of "Apartheid" as Trope and Mode of Reference, 1948 -1980
Supervisor: Prof. Louise Bethlehem
Abstract
This thesis traces the ways in which apartheid as a signifier had been mobilized by Zionist and anti-Zionist conversations in the 1950s-1970s, transforming the postcolonial organization of urban space. I initiate my historiographic narrative by viewing how apartheid was circulated as a trope during Israel’s early state-building years, shaping the ways in which Zionistshow more
Sep 2015 MA Thesis The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Miriam Makeba in Guinea--Deterritorializing History through Music
Supervisor: Prof. Louise Bethlehem
Abstract
This work revisits the cultural history of Guinea-­‐Conakry in the three decades following independence (1958) by applying a historiographic heuristic that relies on musical materials and the political and cultural meanings that are embedded within the sonic formations. Through the Guinean case study, this thesis demonstrates how music can expose latent cultural dynamicsshow more